THE URATE BURDEN MAY BE GREATER THAN IT APPEARS

Advanced imaging techniques make it possible to see the true extent of urate deposits or crystals.1,13,14

Recent studies using these advanced techniques show that patients with chronic gout have extensive urate deposits that can’t be seen by traditional clinical examination.1,13

An imaging study by Choi et al (N=20) found 4x more tophi on dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) scan vs thorough clinical exam.13

Radiograph may appear normal. DECT scan shows evidence of urate burden.14

Slider control Icon
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Green areas in DECT scan indicate deposited urate.

Images have been adapted with permission from Desai MA et al. RadioGraphics. 2011;31(5):1365-1375.

review clinical evidence
of nonvisible tophi.

see how dect
scans work.

Crystal deposition

Nonvisible clusters of uric acid crystals can deposit almost anywhere.8

Inflammatory
response
with pain

Urate crystals cause macrophages to release cytokines, triggering the recruitment of neutrophils.8

NEUTROPHIL NETosis AND DNA EXTRUSION

Neutrophils at the attack site ingest uric acid crystals and then undergo NETosis. During NETosis, neutrophils extrude their DNA over the crystals.8

NEUTROPHIL NETosis AND DNA EXTRUSION

Neutrophils at the attack site ingest uric acid crystals and then undergo NETosis. During NETosis, neutrophils extrude their DNA over the crystals.8

Formation of aggNETs
and pain resolution

DNA extruded during NETosis densely packs uric acid crystals and cytokines, leading to the formation of aggNETs, which are responsible for the rapid resolution of inflammation and pain.8,19

Formation of aggNETs
and pain resolution

DNA extruded during NETosis densely packs uric acid crystals and cytokines, leading to the formation of aggNETs, which are responsible for the rapid resolution of inflammation and pain.8,19

Development
of tophi

The aggNET process results in tophaceous material.8

Normal process
of bone remodeling

In normal bone, osteoclasts and osteoblasts work in conjunction to achieve homeostasis in the process of bone remodeling.12

Localized bone erosion

Tophi often directly overlay bone, reducing osteoblast viability and increasing osteoclast formation and activity. This results in an imbalance, leading to bone erosion independent of pain.8,12,20-24

Visible and nonvisible tophi have been associated
with structural joint damage6,11,12,14

Crystal deposition & bone erosion CAN CONTINUE INDEPENDENT of pain

An sUA of 6 mg/dL is not low enough for many patients with gout.27

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aggNETs Slide Deck

This PowerPoint helps explain the role of aggregated neutrophil extracellular traps (aggNETs) in gout disease progression.

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COMPLETE TOPHI
RESOLUTION

See the data on how effective KRYSTEXXA is in lowering sUA levels and resolving tophi.

IDENTIFYING
PATIENTS

Consider these types of patients with uncontrolled gout and see if KRYSTEXXA could be right for them.

INDICATIONS AND USAGE

KRYSTEXXA® (pegloticase) is indicated for the treatment of chronic gout in adult patients who have failed to normalize serum uric acid and whose signs and symptoms are inadequately controlled with xanthine oxidase inhibitors at the maximum medically appropriate dose or for whom these drugs are contraindicated.

Important Limitations of Use: KRYSTEXXA is not recommended for the treatment of asymptomatic hyperuricemia.

Important Safety Information

WARNING: ANAPHYLAXIS AND INFUSION REACTIONS

Anaphylaxis and infusion reactions have been reported to occur during and after administration of KRYSTEXXA. Anaphylaxis may occur with any infusion, including a first infusion, and generally manifests within 2 hours of the infusion. However, delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions have also been reported. KRYSTEXXA should be administered in healthcare settings and by healthcare providers prepared to manage anaphylaxis and infusion reactions. Patients should be premedicated with antihistamines and corticosteroids. Patients should be closely monitored for an appropriate period of time for anaphylaxis after administration of KRYSTEXXA. Monitor serum uric acid levels prior to infusions and consider discontinuing treatment if levels increase to above 6 mg/dL, particularly when 2 consecutive levels above 6 mg/dL are observed.

CONTRAINDICATIONS: G6PD DEFICIENCY ASSOCIATED HEMOLYSIS AND METHEMOGLOBINEMIA

Screen patients for G6PD deficiency prior to starting KRYSTEXXA. Hemolysis and methemoglobinemia have been reported with KRYSTEXXA in patients with G6PD deficiency. Do not administer KRYSTEXXA to these patients.

INDICATIONS AND USAGE

KRYSTEXXA® (pegloticase) is indicated for the treatment of chronic gout in adult patients who have failed to normalize serum uric acid and whose signs and symptoms are inadequately controlled with xanthine oxidase inhibitors at the maximum medically appropriate dose or for whom these drugs are contraindicated.

Important Limitations of Use: KRYSTEXXA is not recommended for the treatment of asymptomatic hyperuricemia.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

WARNING: ANAPHYLAXIS AND INFUSION REACTIONS

Anaphylaxis and infusion reactions have been reported to occur during and after administration of KRYSTEXXA. Anaphylaxis may occur with any infusion, including a first infusion, and generally manifests within 2 hours of the infusion. However, delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions have also been reported. KRYSTEXXA should be administered in healthcare settings and by healthcare providers prepared to manage anaphylaxis and infusion reactions. Patients should be premedicated with antihistamines and corticosteroids. Patients should be closely monitored for an appropriate period of time for anaphylaxis after administration of KRYSTEXXA. Monitor serum uric acid levels prior to infusions and consider discontinuing treatment if levels increase to above 6 mg/dL, particularly when 2 consecutive levels above 6 mg/dL are observed.

The risk of anaphylaxis and infusion reactions is higher in patients who have lost therapeutic response.

Concomitant use of KRYSTEXXA and oral urate-lowering agents may blunt the rise of sUA levels. Patients should discontinue oral urate-lowering agents and not institute therapy with oral urate-lowering agents while taking KRYSTEXXA.

In the event of anaphylaxis or infusion reaction, the infusion should be slowed, or stopped and restarted at a slower rate.

Inform patients of the symptoms and signs of anaphylaxis, and instruct them to seek immediate medical care should anaphylaxis occur after discharge from the healthcare setting.

CONTRAINDICATIONS: G6PD DEFICIENCY ASSOCIATED HEMOLYSIS AND METHEMOGLOBINEMIA

Screen patients for G6PD deficiency prior to starting KRYSTEXXA. Hemolysis and methemoglobinemia have been reported with KRYSTEXXA in patients with G6PD deficiency. Do not administer KRYSTEXXA to these patients.

GOUT FLARES

An increase in gout flares is frequently observed upon initiation of anti-hyperuricemic therapy, including treatment with KRYSTEXXA. If a gout flare occurs during treatment, KRYSTEXXA need not be discontinued. Gout flare prophylaxis with a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) or colchicine is recommended starting at least 1 week before initiation of KRYSTEXXA therapy and lasting at least 6 months, unless medically contraindicated or not tolerated.

CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE

KRYSTEXXA has not been studied in patients with congestive heart failure, but some patients in the clinical trials experienced exacerbation. Exercise caution when using KRYSTEXXA in patients who have congestive heart failure and monitor patients closely following infusion.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

Please see Full Prescribing Information and Medication Guide for more information.

INDICATIONS AND USAGE

KRYSTEXXA® (pegloticase) is indicated for the treatment of chronic gout in adult patients who have failed to normalize serum uric acid and whose signs and symptoms are inadequately controlled with xanthine oxidase inhibitors at the maximum medically appropriate dose or for whom these drugs are contraindicated.

Important Limitations of Use: KRYSTEXXA is not recommended for the treatment of asymptomatic hyperuricemia.

Important Safety Information

WARNING: ANAPHYLAXIS AND INFUSION REACTIONS

Anaphylaxis and infusion reactions have been reported to occur during and after administration of KRYSTEXXA. Anaphylaxis may occur with any infusion, including a first infusion, and generally manifests within 2 hours of the infusion. However, delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions have also been reported. KRYSTEXXA should be administered in healthcare settings and by healthcare providers prepared to manage anaphylaxis and infusion reactions. Patients should be premedicated with antihistamines and corticosteroids. Patients should be closely monitored for an appropriate period of time for anaphylaxis after administration of KRYSTEXXA. Monitor serum uric acid levels prior to infusions and consider discontinuing treatment if levels increase to above 6 mg/dL, particularly when 2 consecutive levels above 6 mg/dL are observed.

CONTRAINDICATIONS: G6PD DEFICIENCY ASSOCIATED HEMOLYSIS AND METHEMOGLOBINEMIA

Screen patients for G6PD deficiency prior to starting KRYSTEXXA. Hemolysis and methemoglobinemia have been reported with KRYSTEXXA in patients with G6PD deficiency. Do not administer KRYSTEXXA to these patients.

INDICATIONS AND USAGE

KRYSTEXXA® (pegloticase) is indicated for the treatment of chronic gout in adult patients who have failed to normalize serum uric acid and whose signs and symptoms are inadequately controlled with xanthine oxidase inhibitors at the maximum medically appropriate dose or for whom these drugs are contraindicated.

Important Limitations of Use: KRYSTEXXA is not recommended for the treatment of asymptomatic hyperuricemia.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

WARNING: ANAPHYLAXIS AND INFUSION REACTIONS

Anaphylaxis and infusion reactions have been reported to occur during and after administration of KRYSTEXXA. Anaphylaxis may occur with any infusion, including a first infusion, and generally manifests within 2 hours of the infusion. However, delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions have also been reported. KRYSTEXXA should be administered in healthcare settings and by healthcare providers prepared to manage anaphylaxis and infusion reactions. Patients should be premedicated with antihistamines and corticosteroids. Patients should be closely monitored for an appropriate period of time for anaphylaxis after administration of KRYSTEXXA. Monitor serum uric acid levels prior to infusions and consider discontinuing treatment if levels increase to above 6 mg/dL, particularly when 2 consecutive levels above 6 mg/dL are observed.

The risk of anaphylaxis and infusion reactions is higher in patients who have lost therapeutic response.

Concomitant use of KRYSTEXXA and oral urate-lowering agents may blunt the rise of sUA levels. Patients should discontinue oral urate-lowering agents and not institute therapy with oral urate-lowering agents while taking KRYSTEXXA.

In the event of anaphylaxis or infusion reaction, the infusion should be slowed, or stopped and restarted at a slower rate.

Inform patients of the symptoms and signs of anaphylaxis, and instruct them to seek immediate medical care should anaphylaxis occur after discharge from the healthcare setting.

CONTRAINDICATIONS: G6PD DEFICIENCY ASSOCIATED HEMOLYSIS AND METHEMOGLOBINEMIA

Screen patients for G6PD deficiency prior to starting KRYSTEXXA. Hemolysis and methemoglobinemia have been reported with KRYSTEXXA in patients with G6PD deficiency. Do not administer KRYSTEXXA to these patients.

GOUT FLARES

An increase in gout flares is frequently observed upon initiation of anti-hyperuricemic therapy, including treatment with KRYSTEXXA. If a gout flare occurs during treatment, KRYSTEXXA need not be discontinued. Gout flare prophylaxis with a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) or colchicine is recommended starting at least 1 week before initiation of KRYSTEXXA therapy and lasting at least 6 months, unless medically contraindicated or not tolerated.

CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE

KRYSTEXXA has not been studied in patients with congestive heart failure, but some patients in the clinical trials experienced exacerbation. Exercise caution when using KRYSTEXXA in patients who have congestive heart failure and monitor patients closely following infusion.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

Please see Full Prescribing Information and Medication Guide for more information.

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